During coronavirus, students deal with job changes

Junior+Emily+Mowery+works+at+30+Burger%2C+a+restuarant+in+Texarkana+owned+by+her+parents.+While+many+students+are+without+a+job+during+the+coronavirus%2C+some+students+are+able+to+adapt+to+changes+and+keep+their+jobs.+

30 Burger

Junior Emily Mowery works at 30 Burger, a restuarant in Texarkana owned by her parents. While many students are without a job during the coronavirus, some students are able to adapt to changes and keep their jobs.

While many workers are facing being laid off or fired to accommodate for the coronavirus, junior Austin Bradley is still coming in to work at Texarkana Golf Ranch to do his part. He is one of a handful of students who are able to work during this time.

“I’m still working because the place I work is considered ‘essential,’” Austin said. 

His job at the Golf Ranch is keeping him occupied and surrounded by fresh air while he washes golf carts and picks golf balls from the driving range. While Austin doesn’t come in contact with anyone on the job, there is a question about each business being considered essential enough for work. However, Austin understands both sides of this question and continues to see the positive side of working. 

“A part of me doesn’t think I should [be working] because I could get the virus from working,” Austin said. “But I’m glad I am because I still have a steady income although it’s not much with all of this stuff happening.”

Another student who has continued to work is senior Palmer Duke who works at a shooting range called Rocky Creek Outdoors. The virus pandemonium hasn’t affected people’s desire to shoot as they are still getting customers.

“If we didn’t go out there at least some, a bunch of the machines would break,” Palmer said. “It would cost the club more in repair bills than to just have our work a little bit.”

While many students’ passions were faced with cancellations surrounding coronavirus, Palmer gets to continue to be around what he loves to do. Not only does his work call for it but he also spends some of his free time practicing shooting at Rocky Creek as well.

“I’m glad [I’m still working] because I enjoy it. We’ve worked super short hours during this anyways,” Palmer said.

Especially with the concern of local businesses closing, junior Emily Mowery is in a different place as she continues to work at her family’s restaurant, 30 Burger.

“I’m glad I’m still working. People still have to eat and I still have to make my car payments,” Emily said.

Another reason Emily is glad to lend a hand around the restaurant is for her family. There was concern at the beginning about the fate of their restaurant, just as any locally based restaurant is experiencing during this time, but 30 Burger has been receiving a healthy amount of customers since the shelter-in-place order was enacted.

“It’s been insanely busy ever since we were told we couldn’t leave the house unless for essentials, though,” Emily said. “We aren’t so worried anymore but we’re still keeping an eye on money just in case.”

The change in her working dynamic also reflects the demand for food during this time.

“Normally people would just order at the register, and now I answer the phone to take an order with three or four people trying to call me at the same time,” Emily said.

Emily’s coworkers are helping push Emily through working in these uncertain times, along with it being a reason to be out of the house.

“It makes me feel better to be able to work,” Emily said. “I can only leave the house for work, and my coworkers are some of the best people to be around. It brightens my day.”