Art Department Holds Fashion Show — With Trash

Art+Club+members+Rose+Andersen+and+Wilhemina+%22Willow%22+Celso+pose+with+the+trophy+for+having+the+best+costumes+at+the+fashion+show.
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Art Department Holds Fashion Show — With Trash

Art Club members Rose Andersen and Wilhemina

Art Club members Rose Andersen and Wilhemina "Willow" Celso pose with the trophy for having the best costumes at the fashion show.

Nicole Brisco

Art Club members Rose Andersen and Wilhemina "Willow" Celso pose with the trophy for having the best costumes at the fashion show.

Nicole Brisco

Nicole Brisco

Art Club members Rose Andersen and Wilhemina "Willow" Celso pose with the trophy for having the best costumes at the fashion show.

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Trash. It smells, it’s gross, and it’s definitely not what we think of when people say art. 

On Monday, Nov. 18, art students hopped on a bus headed to First Baptist Church Texarkana. Many students expected it to be another reason to skip class, which wasn’t the case when they got there.

“At first I wasn’t sure what we were going to be doing,” freshman Rose Andersen said. “I kind of thought we were going to be working on our scholastic project, so I was really excited when I got there and found out we were doing something totally different.”

Since the start of this project three years ago, the art department has continued to fund and support this project for art students.

“I started it three years ago,” said Art teacher Nicole Brisco, “out of a creative problem-solving moment in which I was trying to find out how we could still have a winter event without it being out of school but still involve school related activities”

Nicole Brisco
Art Club members gather in the FBC building to design different costumes made out of recycled materials.

Students are separated into groups, and are given the assignment to create a garment out of nontraditional materials provided in six hours. 

“When I came in and saw a huge pile of trash, I was very surprised,” said sophomore Julie Yeo, “When they told me we had six hours I thought this will be a challenge.”

When you think of art, trash isn’t the exact thing that comes to mind. The thought of using waste products in something that might be hung in a museum might be a little odd, but this project definitely helps the art students to see art and approach their art in different ways.

“Seeing that you can make art out of anything has made an impact on my art,” said Art Club President Ellie Tye.

What started out as a creative problem-solving moment evolved into a new way to see and experience art.

“It’s just out there,” said junior Jay Branch, “ wearing an outfit made of trash. I mean how are you going to forget that?”

 

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